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Tonight is the official world premiere of Robert on his Lunch Break.

I’m looking forward to it, though of course I’m a little nervous.

Right now I have some down time, so here are a few odds and ends…

Earlier this week I did a Google search for “Prurient” (the noise artist who contributed sounds to my new film) and discovered a recent interview with him in Pitchfork. I’ve been meaning to write a spiel about Dom, but this isn’t a bad introduction for those unfamiliar with his work–the link is worth clicking on just to see the funny picture of him with a pentagram, 666, and a couple of upside-down crosses.

Also…

A Screengrab from Jan Troell's Everlasting Moments

A Screengrab from Jan Troell's Everlasting Moments

A Screengrab from Jan Troell's Everlasting Moments

A Screengrab from Jan Troell's Everlasting Moments

Last week I watched Jan Troell’s Everlasting Moments and it made me cry three times. Usually, when the word “masterful” is applied to a director or film, I feel like cringing, but in this case it’s entirely appropriate. In fact, after seeing this Swedish gem I felt obliged to amend my Top Ten [“Narrative”] Films of the Aughts list, which is now as follows:

1. Nobody Knows – Hirokazu Kore-Eda
2. The Man Without a Past – Aki Kaurismaki
3. Everlasting Moments – Jan Troell
4. The Son – Jean-Pierre and Luc Dardenne
5. Distant – Nuri Bilge Ceylan
6. Schizo – Gulshat Omarova
7. Crimson Gold – Jafar Panahi
8. Colossal Youth – Pedro Costa
9. Tokyo Rendezvous – Chihiro Ikeda
10. Taste of Tea – Katsuhito Ishii

Everlasting Moments takes place during the Early Twentieth Century and chronicles the life of an overworked homemaker who discovers the pleasures of photography while trying to make ends meet and enduring the proclivities of her insensitive-but-lovable husband. Troell’s film displays an expert-level attention to detail and nearly every scene is rife with some sort of poetic import that makes Everlasting Moments so much more than a sentimental period-piece. Don’t be fooled by the sepia-toned artwork on the DVD release–this is a remarkable movie.

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